Linux is ready

February 3, 2008

Why Linux? Well, the answer to this question was given in detail by PK Mishra, Senior Consulting Architect, Novell India in his presentation titled ‘Linux for eGovernance solution.’ In this session, he explained where and how Linux can be used and how it is absolutely ready for government as well as enterprises. According to him, cost, choice, security and reliability along with standards, peer review, freedom, flexibility, no lock in, TCO, reuse, and ROI are some of the significant advantages of using Linux. Talking about government, Mishra said, “Government has a complex way of operating and the role of the government is far from profits. Government costs are critical factors and they have to do things at the optimum cost.” Some of the ways to achieve this would be to improve server utilization and decrease the cost of owning and managing the same; deploy solutions on high volume, industry-standard hardware architectures; leverage open source and open standards maximally; use validated solution stacks for optimum performance & reliability; and decouple services from hardware by virtualizing servers, storage and the network.

Further, talking about adaptive data centres, he felt that enterprise-scale IT services must be hosted in a data centre that dynamically reconfigures itself based on policies that adapt to changing conditions like spikes in workloads, unforeseen failures and exigencies. He went on to talk about some of the features of Novell’s Linux with regard to reliability, availability and scalability. Heartbeat 2.x, AppArmor and XEN were some of the technologies discussed by Mishra on the availability, security and virtualization fronts respectively. He gave details of AppArmor which creates a firewall around any Linux program and isolates it from the rest of the system and Novell Identity Manager which automates password management and synchronizes access to all applications. Talking about Linux management, MIshra said, “Linux management is extremely important for the government as they will grow exponentially in about ten years and for that, management in a systematic and policy-based manner is important.”

He elaborated on the issue of interoperability which is a prime concern and the initiative by Novell in this area. He even listed some of the successful Linux implementations in the government sector by many components of citizen services, Indian railways, Indian courts, Indian police system, and some public sector organizations (banks, oil sector, airlines). He cited the case of the Tamil Nadu Government that has adopted SUSE Linux as its platform for all of its Citizen-Centric Service Delivery and thus, Linux, Particularly SUSE Linux Enterprise from Novell is absolutely ready for government projects.

For help with all of your linux consulting needs, contact The Tek, LLC and Brian Carpio at 877-4-TheTek

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Brian Carpio EzineArticles.com Expert Aurthor

January 26, 2008

Brian Carpio has been given the award of Expert author by EzineArticles.com, after the continued submission of amazing technology related articles. Brian Carpio is an industry expert and has continued to provide valuable content to the IT community.

With years of experience as a Linux, Unux and VoIP consultant, Brian Carpio, has the industry experience to share with his colleagues and other industry professionals.

To find more great articles by Brian Carpio, please visit his profile at EzineArticles.com here:

http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Brian_Carpio


Digg Changes And Word Of Warcraft Changes Compared!?

January 24, 2008

One of the largest social bookmarking sites on the internet today makes changes to their algorithm which will open the doors for more webmasters and websites to gain exposure. Read how this compares to the changes that the largest online MMORPG made to satisfy the masses over the hardcore grinders.

Its no surprise that Digg.com has the largest user base of any Social Bookmarking site on the internet today, however Digg.com has been primarily dominated by a small group of “Digg Elitists” who had major control on which articles made the front page and which did not. The problem with this is that most webmasters have feel that gaining exposure from Digg was a waste of time, just take a look at some popular webmaster forums such as DigitalPoint, Syndk8.net, and WebmasterWord.com there are countless threads about people who abandon Digg because “its hopeless to get any exposure there”.

I agree that its time Digg evened up the score and allowed users who don’t spend day and nigh on Digg to still gain exposure from this popular social medium.

So how does this even compare to World Of Warcraft? Well the answer is simple, when burning crusades came out Blizzard made the decision to do away with the 40-man instances and only offer 25-man instances. Many so-called “Hardcore Raiders” where very upset about this decision and many “Casual Players” where extremely excited.

Here is a great article which explains in-depth what exactly blizzard did to open up more content to the “Casual Player”

http://www.wowinsider.com/2008/01/11/wow-casually-the-year-of-the-casual/

So why should “communities” such as these continue to try and give a far advantage to the “Casual User” well the answer is quite simple, its the casual user that is going to make or break the site. At the end of the day its the “Casual User” who generates income for these companies not the “Hardcore Users”. It isn’t that we don’t appreciate the hardcore WoW players or even the “Digg Elitists” who helped start and generate the buzz surrounding these companies, because we do appreciate you, but for any company to succeed they need to continue to help even the playing field.

I know I don’t have 10 hours a day to play WoW but I would still like Epic armor, sorry but that is a fact, I would bet most people don’t have 10 hours a day to grind and raid but would still like SOME of the benefits. The same thing goes for Digg, I don’t have 10 hours a day to submit and Digg articles, I can most defiantly spend a few hours a week working on content and promoting what I feel are good, well written articles so should i be penalized because my life doesn’t revolve around Digg? NO.

I also don’t have the time nor the want to try and build some elitist Digg  community so we can inflate the number of “Real” people who are actually interested in my article. This is the wrong approach and its about time Digg and WoW and all other community drive applications take a stand and continue to make their services available to the “Casual Consumer/User”.

So thank GOD Kevin Rose is looking out for the “Casual User” we enjoy your site just as much as the next person, we value the content and we appreciate the chance to have a fair chance with our articles.


Linux developer switches to Microsoft’s Windows Security Team

January 23, 2008

According to Microsoft, the company was able to win over the brains behind the AppArmor Linux security system. Crispin Cowan now belongs to the core of the Windows Security Team that developed User Account Control (UAC) and integrity levels. What motivated Cowan to switch from open source to closed source is still unknown. Microsoft’s Michael Howard is exuberant about his intelligent, open and “brutally pragmatic” colleague in his Microsoft blog.

In October of last year, Novell parted with Cowan and five other AppArmor developers, who had been brought on board in mid-2005 following the company’s acquisition of Immunix, which included AppArmor. AppArmor safeguards access by processes to system objects such as files and network ports by adding a control layer to the Linux kernel. You can specify via capabilities whether a program is allowed to open network sockets. This is intended to limit the effects of a breach in the system.

Novell repeatedly attempted to integrate app armor into the official Linux kernel maintained by Linus Torvalds, but came up against resistance in the developer community. The community’s reservations were primarily aimed at the process of identifying files by their names. Currently, Suse, Ubuntu, and Mandriva all use AppArmor. Red Hat uses SELinux.

After his departure, Crispin Cowan had planned to continue work on AppArmor with some of his colleagues – including Steve Beattie and Dominic Reynolds, whom Novell had also sacked – in a new consulting firm. It is still unclear whether Cowan plans to continue developing AppArmor parallel to his duties at Microsoft or he will discontinue work on it, or whether one of the big distributors will take over further development. Heise Security has yet to receive a response to an inquiry made of Cowan.


Sears.com to offer $199 Linux PCs

January 23, 2008

Linspire, Inc., developers of community desktop Linux operating systems, and Mirus Innovations, a North American PC manufacturer, have announced the availability of a $199 Linux PC that will be sold through Sears.com.

Available now, the $199 Linux PC (after a $100 mail-in rebate) features a 1.6GHz Intel Celeron processor, 1GB memory, 80GB hard drive, Freespire 2.0 and free CNR software delivery service.

“It is breaking price point barriers,” said Larry Kettler, president and CEO of Linspire.”It was extremely important [for us] to show how far the [Linux] OS has come and how useful the OS is for average users.”

Other features of the Linux PC include a card reader, a modem, CD-RW, keyboard, speakers and mouse. As well, it offers out-of-the-box file type and multimedia support, such as MP3, Windows Media, Real Networks, Java, Flash, ATI, nVidia and WiFi.

Freespire 2.0 also adds legally licensed proprietary drivers, codecs and applications in its core distribution, to provide a better overall user experience. Freespire is a community-influenced, Ubuntu-based Linux distribution that is designed to be powerful enough for sophisticated Linux users and developers, yet easy enough for someone new to Linux.

CNR.com is a free one-click software delivery service requiring no registration to use. CNR.com users can search for applications by title, popularity, user rating, category and function. An open source client for each supported distribution is then used to add the one-click installation as well as auto-updating functionality.


Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Wins SearchEnterpriseLinux.com ‘Product of the Year’

January 23, 2008

Red Hat (NYSE: RHT), the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 has been selected as Gold medalist winner in the SearchEnterpriseLinux.com 2007 ‘Products of the Year’ awards, in the Linux Server Distributions category. This annual award is presented by the editors of TechTarget’s Data Center Media Group.

The ‘Products of the Year’ awards were judged by the SearchEnterpriseLinux.com editorial staff, in conjunction with a team of users, industry experts, analysts and consultants. Judging was based on six criteria, including innovation, performance, ease of integration into existing environments, ease of use and manageability, functionality and value. Judges characterized Red Hat Enterprise Linux as “a solid choice for mainstream computing,” and “a full-featured release that delivers on a range of roadmap commitments, especially for CPU support, drivers, virtualization and package updates and upgrades.”

With solutions that span from the desktop to the data center, Red Hat Enterprise Linux offers compelling levels of performance, security and robustness, and is certified by leading enterprise hardware and software vendors. Enterprise Linux couples the innovation of open source and the stability of a true enterprise-class platform.

“Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 provides our customers with industry-leading virtualization capabilities, an impressive deployment ecosystem and world-record setting performance,” said Scott Crenshaw, vice president, Enterprise Linux Business at Red Hat. “To be honored as one of SearchEnterpriseLinux’s ‘Products of the Year’ is a testament to the validity of Red Hat solutions.”

For more information about Red Hat, visit http://www.redhat.com. For more news, more often, visit http://www.press.redhat.com.


Federal Employment Office switches to Linux

January 23, 2008

Shortly after switching all of its 13,000 public internet information workstations from Windows NT to Linux, the Federal Employment Office (BA) issued an interim report. According to an announcement by Klaus Vitt, CIO for the BA, the switch to open source software will, “allow the BA to react with flexibility to new technological developments. In the future, a broad range of software will be available to the BA that it can use to access various internet media, and to ensure optimal internet communication for its clients.”

The BA is using the OpenSuse 10.1 Remastered distribution and the latest version of the Firefox web browser. The software was installed on the server as a repository and the clients can access it via PXE Boot. The BA told heise online that the switch, concluded at the end of last year, lasted some nine months including planning and did not involve any external service providers – it carried no additional costs.

The BA explained that the migration was necessary because, “The previous combination of Windows NT and Internet Explorer could no longer keep pace with technological developments in how current media content is displayed and was not up to the demands of modern hardware.” In making the switch, the decision for Linux was based on cost and security considerations. On the one hand, implementing Linux carried no licencing costs, on the other hand migrating the clients enabled standardised automation and maintenance procedures, since the BA servers also run Linux. Another plus are the flexible configuration possibilities with Linux.

Because the self-service information workstations are freely accessible, the security requirements are especially high. In that respect, it is an added benefit that only a small number of viruses affect Linux systems. All unnecessary software was removed from computers at the internet centres. In addition, the BA has implemented its own security solutions on the systems.